Shannon Bolithoe : A Writing Life


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12 New Books We Recommend This Week

Fall fiction is here and ready to entertain you, as new novels by Nicole Krauss, Salman Rushdie and Nathan Englander can attest. In nonfiction, enhance your viewing of Ken Burns’s “Vietnam War” with James Reston Jr.

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‘Streampunks’ Serves Up YouTube’s Greatest Hits

STREAMPUNKS YouTube and the Rebels Remaking Media By Robert Kyncl with Maany Peyvan 272 pp. Harper Business. $29.99 It’s not easy to write a relevant book about internet culture. By the time it hits the press, the online story has already changed.

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A Late-Night Radio Drama, With Hints of the Internet to Come

Stanley Elkin’s third novel, “The Dick Gibson Show” (1971), is not improving to read. Its heart is not in the right place. It squeezes the blackheads behind the ears of your imagination; it’s a Diane Arbus walk on the unreconciled side.

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When the Governments of the World Agreed to Banish War

THE INTERNATIONALISTS How a Radical Plan to Outlaw War Remade the World By Oona A. Hathaway and Scott J. Shapiro Illustrated. 581 pp. Simon & Schuster. $30. The Kellogg-Briand Pact of 1928, also known as the Paris Peace Pact, does not have a good reputation, for obvious reasons.

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NPR News: In ‘The Ninth Hour,’ A Tonic For The Ills Of The World

In ‘The Ninth Hour,’ A Tonic For The Ills Of The World
Alice McDermott’s new novel immerses readers in the homely details of Irish Catholic Brooklyn in the early decades of the 20th century, but also addresses bigger, universal questions of love and life.

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NPR News: In ‘The Twelve-Mile Straight,’ Characters Are Symbols First, People Second

In ‘The Twelve-Mile Straight,’ Characters Are Symbols First, People Second
Eleanor Henderson’s novel, set in 1930s Georgia, seeks to portray a time when “slavery was over, but not past,” says our reviewer. But a lack of nuance keeps its characters from emerging as individuals.

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