Shannon Bolithoe : A Writing Life

Most Common Writing Mistakes, Pt. 45: Avoiding “Said” 

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Most Common Writing Mistakes, Pt. 45: Avoiding “Said”

“What’s this, you say? Avoiding “said” is one of the most common writing mistakes? How can that be? Surely writers overuse this ubiquitous little word more often than not, don’t they? As a matter of fact: nope. Indeed, trying to avoid this hard-working little speaker-attribution tag can, in most instances, lead you into some major prose problems.

If you run a word-frequency search through your manuscript, “said” is probably the verb that shows up the most. For some writers, that sets off alarm bells in their heads. If a word shows up that frequently, then surely you must be overusing it. Readers will notice its repetition and stumble over it as it clutters your prose.

As a result, you might be tempted to start replacing “said” with more colorful alternatives. After all, writers are always being told to look beyond pedestrian verbs like “walked” for more specific and “showing” choices, such as “sauntered,” “limped,” and “marched.” The same must be true of “said,” right?

It’s a legit question–so let us take a look…”

http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/kmweiland.com/podcast/mistake-45.mp3

Click the “Play” button to Listen to Audio Version (or subscribe to the Helping Writers Become Authors podcast in iTunes).

The post Most Common Writing Mistakes, Pt. 45: Avoiding “Said” appeared first on Helping Writers Become Authors.

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Author: SBolithoe

Librarian, author, blogger, presenter, history buff and animal lover.

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